Revelation

God reveals Himself in Jesus.
As soon as Jesus was baptized, he went up out of the water. At that moment heaven was opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting on him.  And a voice from heaven said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.”  Matt 3:17-18
Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This unit is introducing the role of the Church in getting to know God. The pupils should be given as many opportunities to role-play, talk in pairs, in groups and to different adults. They need to use visual prompts as much as possible, as well as articulate the words in the stories and role-play what a priest does. The feeding of the five thousand is a story they consider in more detail in years 1 and 2, but they should be able to discuss why Jesus is special and start to suggest what this tells us about God.
The multi-faith element introduces the religion of Sikhism.

Prior Learning in RE
  • Stories about Jesus.
  • Know that Jesus is the Son in the Sign of the Cross.
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Sorting activities using Venn diagrams.
  • Role-play.
Vocabulary
  • Feeding of the five thousand
  • Priest
  • Church
  • God
  • Jesus
  • Shows
  • Prayer
Explanation of the Theology

God, in His goodness and wisdom, reveals Himself. With deeds and words, He reveals Himself and His plan of loving goodness which He decreed from all eternity in Christ.

Cf paragraph 6 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church

God shows himself to us in Jesus. God shows himself in the Church.

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

In this unit the pupils are introduced to stories that show how special Jesus is. They begin to explore, through the story of the good Samaritan, what God’s love is like. The pupils are also introduced to miracles stories, which show how important Jesus is and to the idea of signs and symbols.

The multi-faith element introduces the religion of Sikhism

Prior Learning in RE
  • Stories about Jesus.
  • Know that Jesus is the Son in the Sign of the Cross.
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Thinking skills, including fishbone diagrams, similar/different diagrams.
  • Painting.
  • Postcard writing.
  • Using story board.
  • Wanted posters.
  • Role-play.
  • SEAL (Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning).
Vocabulary
  • Parable
  • Forgiveness
  • Miracles
  • Good Samaritan
  • Sikhism
  • Guru Nanak
Explanation of the Theology

Jesus accompanied his words with signs and miracles to bear witness to the fact that the Kingdom is present in him. Although he healed some people, he did not come to abolish all evils but to free us from sin.

Cf Paragraph 108 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Jesus also used parables to teach us and guide us and the parables show us that he was God’s Son.

God shows himself to us in Jesus. Jesus gave us signs and stories to show that God’s kingdom was in him.

(Remember that there is no direct reference to an inn-keeper in the Gospel).

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This helps the pupils become aware of stories from Scripture, which show how special Jesus is. The miracle stories show that the Kingdom of God is present within him. The unit enables the pupils to explore the parables and begin to understand some of the meaning behind them. The multi-faith element explores some of the things that Sikhs do to show their faith.

Prior Learning in RE
  • Some parables of Jesus
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Creating fact files
  • Letter writing
  • Thinking skills, including fishbone diagrams, similar/different diagrams
  • Poetry
  • Writing headlines
  • Creating simple maps.
Vocabulary
  • Kingdom of God
  • Parable
  • Miracles
  • Anointing
  • Oil
  • Symbols
  • Three duties of a Sikh
Explanation of the Theology

Jesus accompanied his words with signs and miracles to bear witness to the fact that the Kingdom is present in him. Although he healed some people, he did not come to abolish all evils, but to free us from sin.

Cf Paragraph 108 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Whilst the purpose of a parable is normally to teach us, Jesus also used parables to proclaim the kingdom.

God shows Himself to us in Jesus. Jesus gave us signs and stories to show that God’s Kingdom was in him.

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This unit is designed to support pupils in year 3 who may be making their first Holy Communion and begin to understand the parts of the Mass. Pupils are invited to explore how Sacred Scripture proclaims ways in which we are saved. It explores the response of Samuel to God’s plan and considers what we can learn from it.

Opportunities are provided for pupils to know what the Liturgy of the Word is and what our response should be, as well as broadening their knowledge of what is contained in the Bible.

It introduces work on the Presentation and the Baptism of Jesus to enable pupils to begin to explore how people recognised God’s revelation of Himself in Jesus. The multi-faith element explores what happens at the Gurdwara – the Sikh place of worship.

Prior Learning in RE
  • Stories that help us recognise Jesus as God’s Son
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Creating fact files
  • Letter writing
  • Thinking skills, including affinity diagrams, concept maps
Vocabulary
  • Liturgy of the Word
  • Old Testament
  • New Testament
  • God’s voice
  • Gurdwara
Explanation of the Theology

God is the author of the Sacred Scripture. The Holy Spirit inspired the human authors, who wrote what He wanted to teach us. The Christian faith, however, is not a ‘religion of the Book’, but of the Word of God: “not a written and mute word but incarnate and living” (Saint Bernard of Claivaux).

Cf Paragraph 18 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

The Holy Spirit helps us understand the Word of God, which is lived out in the Church.

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This unit considers two examples of God’s revelation of Himself in Jesus. In the Presentation, the revelation of God is recognised by Simeon and Anna. In the Transfiguration, the disciples respond with fear but beheld His glory. Consideration is also given to the symbolism of light and why this symbol is important.

In the multi-faith element, the origins of the Sikh religion and their celebrations of light over darkness are considered.

Prior Learning in RE
  • The Baptism of Jesus and the words spoken by the Father
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • ICT skills
  • Calligrams
  • Writing play scripts
  • Writing simple job descriptions
  • Thinking skills, including timelines, continuum lines, creating diagrams.
Vocabulary
  • Transfiguration
  • Revelation
  • Mysteries of Light
  • Nunc Dimittis.
  • Salvation
  • Glory
Explanation of the Theology

In the account of the Presentation, Simeon and Anna symbolise all the anticipation of Israel, awaiting its encounter with
its Saviour.

Cf Paragraph 103 Compendium Catechism of the Catholic Church.

At the time of his Baptism and Transfiguration, the voice of the Father designated Jesus as His “beloved Son”. Above all, the Transfiguration shows the Trinity: “the Father in the voice, the Son in the man Jesus, the Spirit in the shining cloud” (Saint Thomas Aquinas). Speaking with Moses and Elijah about his ‘departure’, Jesus reveals that his glory comes by way of the cross and he anticipates his resurrection and his glorious coming,

Cf Paragraphs 83 & 110 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

The apostles and Anna and Simeon saw the glory of Jesus as the only Son of the Father

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This unit considers the recognition of God’s revelation of Himself in Jesus, by John the Baptist. The words; “This is my Son the Beloved, my favour rests on him” can provide a basis for this consideration. The importance of baptism for us is also examined.. Study of certain parables assists with our understanding of the Kingdom of God and helps deepen understanding of how the divine revelation is communicated and passed on. Jesus, through his parables, teaches us to recognise God’s Kingdom.

In the multi-faith element the stories of Guru Nanak are covered and there is an opportunity to reflect on his teachings.

Prior Learning in RE
  • Know that God’s revelation is complete in Jesus
  • Knowledge of the Baptism of Jesus
  • Story of the Transfiguration
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Powerpoint presentations
  • Estate agents’ specification
  • Similes and metaphors
  • Thinking skills, including fishbone diagram, Gantt diagram, similar/different diagram
Vocabulary
  • Revelation
  • Kingdom of God
Explanation of the Theology

God in His goodness and wisdom reveals Himself. With deeds and words, He reveals Himself and His plan of loving goodness, which He decreed from all eternity in Christ. The full and definitive stage of God’s revelation is accomplished in Jesus. In the sending of the Son and the gift of the Spirit, Revelation is now fully complete, although the faith of the Church
must gradually grasp its full significance over the course of centuries.

Cf Paragraphs 6 and 9 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

God reveals Himself in Jesus.

Rationale: aims and purpose of the unit

This unit examines the conversion of St Paul. The impact of this conversion to himself, on those around him and the Church are considered. There is an invitation to reflect on the deep and personal relationship St Paul enjoyed with Jesus and an opportunity to think how we might learn from him. God reveals Himself and His plan of loving goodness. Pupils are invited to consider how this divine revelation is transmitted. In considering Matthew 28:19-20, pupils will consider what is meant by ‘Apostolic Tradition’.

The multi-faith element looks at the role of the guru in the Sikh religion.

Prior Learning in RE
  • Knowledge of St Paul
  • Will know that Jesus is the fullness of God’s revelation
Other Skills and Knowledge Required
  • Knowledge of biography
  • Thinking skills, including fishbone diagrams, Gantt diagrams
Vocabulary
  • Apostolic Tradition
  • Apostle
  • Conversion
  • Revelation
  • Encyclical
Explanation of the Theology

God desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the Truth (1 Timothy 2:4) that is of Jesus Christ. For this reason, Christ must be proclaimed to all according to his own command, “Go forth and teach all nations” (Mt 28:19-20).

Apostolic Tradition is the transmission of the message of Christ brought about from the very beginnings of Christianity, by means of preaching, bearing witness, institutions, worship and inspired writings. The apostles transmitted all they received from Christ and learned from the Holy Spirit to their successors, the bishops, and through them to all generations until the end of the world.

Cf Paragraphs 11 and 12 Compendium: Catechism of the Catholic Church.

God in His goodness and wisdom reveals Himself. In His plan of loving goodness all people by the grace of the Holy Spirit are to share in the divine life of Jesus.